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Recurrent Epistaxis Caused by an Intranasal Supernumerary Tooth in a Young Adult

Hamed O. Al Dhafeeri, Abdulmajid Kavarodi, Khalil Al Shaikh, Ahmed Bukhari, Omair Al Hussain, Ahmed El Baramawy

(Department of Otorhinolaryngology (ORL), King Fahd Military Medical Complex, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia)

Am J Case Rep 2014; 15:291-293

DOI: 10.12659/AJCR.890710

Published: 2014-07-05


Background: Recurrent epistaxis is a common disorder among children and young adults. We report an unusual cause, intranasal supernumerary tooth causing friction with Little’s area of the nasal septum.
Case Report: A 22-year-old male presented with recurrent, mild, unilateral left-sided epistaxis once to twice per month for 3 years. This usually occurred after minor nasal trauma or rubbing his nose. The patient also suffered from recurrent tonsillitis. There was neither history of blood transfusion or nasal packing, nor a history suggestive of bleeding diathesis.
Anterior rhinoscopy revealed ivory white nasal mass antero-inferiorly in the left nasal cavity touching Little’s area. There was no bleeding. Nasal endoscopy showed a white cylindrical bony mass 1 cm long arising from the floor of the nose, with no attachment to the nasal septum or the lateral wall of the nose. Examination of the right nasal cavity was unremarkable.
Conclusions: Nasal teeth result from the ectopic eruption of supernumerary teeth and may cause a variety of symptoms including recurrent epistaxis. Their clinical and radiologic presentation is so characteristic that their diagnosis is not difficult. CT scan is helpful in planning management. Early extraction prevents further complications and prevents further attacks of epistaxis.

Keywords: Epistaxis, Nasal Cavity, tonsillitis, Tooth, Supernumerary



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