ISSN 1941-5923

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Myonecrosis in Sickle Cell Anemia: Case Study

Lalita Prabha Turaga, Prajwal Boddu, Steve Kipferl, Anupam Basu, Martin Yorath

(Department of Podiatry, Advocate Illinois Masonic Hospital/Stroger Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, USA)

Am J Case Rep 2017; 18:100-103

DOI: 10.12659/AJCR.900538

Published: 2017-01-30


BACKGROUND: Myonecrosis is one of the more poorly studied, painful manifestations of sickle cell crisis. Medical literature is sparse detailing the manifestations and management of such symptoms. In myonecrosis, red cells containing sickle hemoglobin become rigid, resulting in reduced blood flow and myonecrosis.
CASE REPORT: We present a case study of a patient in sickle cell crisis with an episode of acute pain and swelling to the intrinsic muscles of the foot as a prominent feature of the crises. Although muscle biopsy is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of myositis or myonecrosis, a low intensity signal on T1 and high intensity signal on T2 at the affected muscle belly can be as conclusive as imaging studies. In an actively sickling patient any invasive intervention should be avoided as it can result in ischemic necrosis of the tissues, due to interruption of capillary flow in end-arteries.
CONCLUSIONS: Early recognition is critical in sickle cell disease management, allowing for prompt and aggressive fluid resuscitation which remains a cornerstone in the management of most sickle cell vaso-occlusive crises. In this instance, off loading the extremity and early fluid resuscitation resolved the pain and swelling and prevented myonecrosis.

Keywords: Anemia, Sickle Cell, Foot, myositis



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