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Basal Ganglia Calcification with Tetanic Seizure Suggest Mitochondrial Disorder

Josef Finsterer, Barbara Enzelsberger, Adam Bastowansky

(Department of Neurology, Krankenanstalt Rudolfstiftung, Vienna, Austria)

Am J Case Rep 2017; 18:375-380

DOI: 10.12659/AJCR.903120

Published: 2017-04-09


BACKGROUND: Basal ganglia calcification (BGC) is a rare sporadic or hereditary central nervous system (CNS) abnormality, characterized by symmetric or asymmetric calcification of the basal ganglia.
CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 65-year-old Gypsy female who was admitted for a tetanic seizure, and who had a history of polyneuropathy, restless-leg syndrome, retinopathy, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, osteoporosis with consecutive hyperkyphosis, cervicalgia, lumbalgia, struma nodosa requiring thyroidectomy and consecutive hypothyroidism, adipositas, resection of a vocal chord polyp, arterial hypertension, coronary heart disease, atheromatosis of the aorta, peripheral artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, steatosis hepatis, mild renal insufficiency, long-term hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, impingement syndrome, spondylarthrosis of the lumbar spine, and hysterectomy. History and clinical presentation suggested a mitochondrial defect which also manifested as hypoparathyroidism or Fanconi syndrome resulting in BGC. After substitution of calcium, no further tetanic seizures occurred.
CONCLUSIONS: Patients with BGC should be investigated for a mitochondrial disorder. A mitochondrial disorder may also manifest as tetanic seizure.

Keywords: Epilepsy, Genetics, Medical, Mitochondrial Diseases



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