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Endovascular Management of May-Thurner Syndrome in a Patient with Left-Sided Superior Vena Cava: A Case Report

Challenging differential diagnosis, Diagnostic / therapeutic accidents, Unusual setting of medical care, Congenital defects / diseases, Educational Purpose (only if useful for a systematic review or synthesis)

Mamoon H. Al-Omari, Qusai M. Aljarrah, Jehad Fataftah, Bashar Ghosheh, Zaid Manasara

(Department of Radiology, Jordan University of Science and Technology, King Abdullah University Hospital, Irbid, Jordan)

Am J Case Rep 2019; 20:713-718

DOI: 10.12659/AJCR.915724

Published: 2019-05-19


BACKGROUND: May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) is a condition characterized by compression of the left common iliac vein (LCFV) between the right common iliac artery (RCIA) and the lumbar vertebrae. This anatomical entrapment typically affects young women and is mostly asymptomatic. High index of suspicion is required in cases of recurrent left-sided deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and severe leg pain. We describe a case of MTS in a young male patient with a left-sided superior vena cava (LSSVC) that was successfully managed by an endovascular approach. To the best of our knowledge, the coexistence of MTS and LSSVC anomaly has not been reported previously.
CASE REPORT: A 31-year-old man presented with a history of left-sided iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis and disabling venous claudication of 2 years’ duration. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography venogram (CTV) revealed evidence of MTS with chronic subtotal occlusion of the left common iliac vein (LCIV) with extensive venous collaterals. Venogram via the left femoral vein puncture confirmed the aforementioned findings. Retrograde recanalization of the occluded segment was attempted without success. Therefore, an antegrade approach via the right internal jugular vein was performed to facilitate recanalization. Surprisingly, venography revealed an LSSVC. The occluded CIV was successfully stented and the patient had complete resolution of his symptoms at 22-month follow-up.
CONCLUSIONS: MTS is a potentially treatable and often-overlooked pathology. In the era of expanded endovascular management of MTS, recognition of this coincidence is essential to prevent unwarranted mishaps during endovascular management when the jugular approach is used.

Keywords: endovascular procedures, Jugular Veins, May-Thurner Syndrome, Stents, Vena Cava, Superior, Venous Thrombosis



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