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A Rare Case of Cerebellar Glioblastoma Mimicking Acute Stroke in an Elderly Patient

Unusual clinical course

Maleeha Zahid, Laura Yapor, Masooma Niazi, Muhammad Adrish, Ahmad Hanif

USA Department of Medicine, Bronx Care Health System, Affiliated with Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Bronx, NY, USA

Am J Case Rep 2020; 21:e927031

DOI: 10.12659/AJCR.927031

Available online: 2020-09-01

Published: 2020-09-09


#927031

BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma (GB) is a common brain tumor that usually presents in the cerebral hemisphere. Very rarely, these tumors can present in the cerebellum. The tumor tends to have a diffuse infiltrative growth that follows the white-matter pathway. Cerebellar GB is often difficult to diagnose on imaging and a biopsy is often needed for diagnosis. Here, we present the case of an elderly woman who presented with symptoms suggestive of acute stroke.
CASE REPORT: An 82-year-old woman presented for intermittent dizziness that started 2 weeks prior to the presentation and had been progressively worsening. She had a prior history of stroke and was noted to have decreased motor strength and sensation to touch on the left side. A cranial nerve examination was normal, as was finger-nose testing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain with and without contrast showed an enhancing lesion in the left posterior cerebellum producing a mass effect in the left lateral ventricle. The differential diagnosis included cerebellitis with abscess, neoplastic process with necrosis, and, less likely, a sub-acute infarction A suboccipital craniotomy with cerebellar biopsy-diagnosed cerebellar GB.
CONCLUSIONS: We report the unique presentation of cerebellar GB in an elderly woman who presented with left-sided weakness, elevated blood pressure, dizziness, vasogenic edema in the left cerebellum, and a mass effect on the fourth ventricle, mimicking acute stroke.

Keywords: Cerebellar Neoplasms, Glioblastoma, Stroke



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