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Influence of Donor Lung Surfactant-A and -B Protein Expression on the Development of Primary Graft Dysfunction After Lung Transplantation: A Pilot Study

Asmae Belhaj, Carine Boven, Laurence Dewachter, Maria Ruiz Patino, Youri Sokolow, BenoƮt Rondelet

(Department of Cardio-Vascular, Thoracic Surgery and Lung Transplantation, CHU UcL Namur, Catholic University of Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium)

Ann Transplant 2017; 22:361-369

DOI: 10.12659/AOT.903313


BACKGROUND: Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is responsible of high early mortality in lung transplanted patients. We measured the rate of surfactant proteins in the organ donor, and we observed the occurrence of lung PGD in the recipient. The co-relation between these two parameters was evaluated.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this pilot study, we prospectively collected blood samples and lung biopsies in thirteen donors at the time of recovery of organs before preservation. Gene expression of SP-A, SP-B, SP-D, and CC16 was evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR. Surfactant proteins plasma levels were evaluated by ELISA. Post-transplant assessments included hemodynamic, arterial blood gas measurements, and radiographic evaluation to determine PGD and lung biopsies.
RESULTS: Nine of the thirteen recipients (69%) developed lung infiltrates and four (31%) developed PGD at either stages 2 or 3. SP-A and SP-B expressions were dramatically reduced in lung allografts of these patients, while lung expression of SP-D and CC16 remained unchanged. Plasma levels of SP-A, SP-B, SP-D, and CC16 did not differ.
CONCLUSIONS: Primary graft dysfunction may be initiated in the donor. Lung allografts with low lung SP-A and SP-B gene expression prior to implantation are associated with increased incidence of lung infiltrates after transplantation.

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