H-Index
14
Scimago Lab
powered by Scopus
eISSN: 1941-5923
call: +1.631.629.4328
Mon-Fri 10 am - 2 pm EST

Logo


Get your full text copy in PDF

Treatment of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst in a 7-Year-Old Boy Using a New Type of Radiofrequency Ablation Electrode

Evanthia Botsa, Ioanna Thanou, Ioannis Nikas, Loukas Thanos

(First Pediatric Clinic, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Agia Sofia Children’s Hospital, Thivon and Levadias, Goudi, Athens, Greece)

Am J Case Rep 2017; 18:953-958

DOI: 10.12659/AJCR.904432


BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation has been established as a treatment method for malignancies and some particular cystic lesions, especially in adults. Experience with radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hydatid cysts, especially in children, is limited.
CASE REPORT: Although echinococcosis is rare, especially in children, we describe a 7-year-old boy with lung and liver cystic echinococcosis. Diagnosis was established by clinical history and imaging findings and confirmed by positive antiechinococcal antibodies. After 6 months of chemotherapy with albendazole, the liver lesion remained and a radiofrequency ablation under computed tomography guidance was obtained. The procedure was performed with a new type of ablation electrode in order to minimize handling and procedure duration and to achieve the best clinical result in only 1 session. This type of electrode provides the ability to simultaneously drain and ablate the cyst and the ability to monitor the desired ablation temperature in real time.
CONCLUSIONS: Our patient is the first pediatric case with hepatic hydatid cyst treated successfully with the use of a new type of radiofrequency ablation electrode under computed tomography guidance.

This paper has been published under Creative Common Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) allowing to download articles and share them with others as long as they credit the authors and the publisher, but without permission to change them in any way or use them commercially.
I agree