H-Index
14
Scimago Lab
powered by Scopus
eISSN: 1941-5923
call: +1.631.629.4328
Mon-Fri 10 am - 2 pm EST

Logo


Get your full text copy in PDF

A Case of Persistence of Normal Tissue Oxygenation Monitored by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) Values Despite Prolonged Perioperative Cardiac Arrest

Julien Maillard, Tornike Sologashvili, John Diaper, Marc-Joseph Licker, Gleicy Keli Barcelos

(Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland)

Am J Case Rep 2019; 20:21-25

DOI: 10.12659/AJCR.911399


BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing cardiac surgery are at risk of adverse perioperative neurological complications. Cerebral oximetry monitoring is increasingly used in these patients to detect intraoperative cerebral hypoxia or ischemic events. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) uses the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum for oximetry imaging. A case is reported of the persistence of normal tissue oxygenation monitored by NIRS values despite a prolonged perioperative cardiac arrest.
CASE REPORT: A 65-year-old man was admitted to the Emergency Department with dysarthria, left facial ptosis, left hemiplegia, and arterial hypotension of 75/50 mmHg. Computed tomography (CT) angiography showed a Stanford type A aortic dissection extending to the right common carotid artery. Shortly after arrival in the operating room, his hemodynamic condition rapidly deteriorated resulting in cardiac arrest. Despite the rapid onset of extracorporeal circulation, adequate systemic blood flow could not be restored. Cerebral NIRS values remained within the normal range (70–80%) from the start of emergency resuscitation, during a prolonged period of extremely low global blood perfusion values, and until all resuscitation ceased.
CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral oximetry values reflect a balance between cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption. This case demonstrated the persistence of normal tissue oxygenation monitored by NIRS values despite a prolonged perioperative cardiac arrest.

This paper has been published under Creative Common Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) allowing to download articles and share them with others as long as they credit the authors and the publisher, but without permission to change them in any way or use them commercially.
I agree