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Spontaneous Rupture in a Non-Laboring Uterus at 20 Weeks: A Case Report

Noorkardiffa Syawalina Omar, Norazilah Mat Jin, Akmal Zulayla Mohd Zahid, Bahiyah Abdullah

(Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Sungai Buloh Campus, Jalan Hospital, Sungai Buloh, Selangor, Malaysia)

Am J Case Rep 2020; 21:e924894

DOI: 10.12659/AJCR.924894


BACKGROUND: Uterine rupture is uncommon but when it happens, it can cause significant morbidity and mortality to both mother and fetus. Incidence reportedly is higher in scarred than in unscarred uteri. Most cases occur in laboring women in their third trimester with a previous history of uterine surgery, such as caesarean delivery or myomectomy. We present a case of spontaneous uterine rupture in a non-laboring uterus in the mid-trimester of pregnancy.
CASE REPORT: The patient presented with threatened miscarriage at 17 weeks’ gestation and ultrasound findings were that raised suspicion of a morbidly adherent placenta. Her history was significant for two previous cesarean deliveries more than 5 years ago followed by two spontaneous complete miscarriages in the first trimester. The patient was managed conservatively until 20 weeks’ gestation, when she presented with acute abdomen with hypotensive shock. Her hemoglobin dropped to a level such that she required blood transfusion. An emergency exploratory laparotomy was performed, which revealed a 5-cm rupture in the lower part of the anterior wall of the uterus, out of which there was extrusion of part of the placenta. Given the patient’s massive bleeding, the decision was made to proceed with subtotal hysterectomy. Histopathology of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of placenta percreta.
CONCLUSIONS: Identification of uterine scarring with morbidly adherent placenta is crucial because even in early pregnancy, it can lead to uterine rupture. Furthermore, failure to recognize and promptly manage uterine rupture may prove fatal.

This paper has been published under Creative Common Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) allowing to download articles and share them with others as long as they credit the authors and the publisher, but without permission to change them in any way or use them commercially.
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